The Scamdex Scam Email Archive - Generic o

Subject:  YOUR ATTENTION IS NEEDED.
From:  "Warranty Center" <ashby@readwet.name>
Date:  Tue, 16 Jul 2013 14:25:02 -0700

A Scam Email with the Subject "YOUR ATTENTION IS NEEDED." was received in one of Scamdex's honeypot email accounts on Tue, 16 Jul 2013 14:25:02 -0700 and has been classified as a Generic Scam. The sender was "Warranty Center" <ashby@readwet.name> , although it may have been spoofed.

THIS LETTER IS TO INFORM YOU THAT YOUR FACTORY WARRANTY WILL ONE EXPIRE BASED ON TIME OR MILES.
WHEN IT DOES EXPIRE YOU WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYING FOR ANY REPAIRS. YOU HAVE THE OPTION OF
CONTINUING TO PROTECT YOUR VEHICLE BEYOND THE FACTORY WARRANTY

PLEASE RESPOND TO THIS OFFER AS SOON AS POSSIBLE TO FIND OUT WHAT YOUR OPTIONS ARE.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW YOUR OPTIONS AT NO COST

ACT NOW BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE.

















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Or send mail to:2500 Quantum Lakes Drive, Ste. 203
Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Can I use my deep-cycle battery as a starting battery? deep-cycle batteries can be used for engine starting but starting batteries should not be used for deep-cycle applications. A deep-cycle battery may have less cranking amps per pound than a starting battery, but in most cases a deep-cycle battery is still more than adequate for the purpose of starting an engine. Trojan Battery Company 04-27-13, 07:26 AM #18 GregH's Avatar GregH GregH is offline Super Moderator Join Date Jan 2001 State: CANADA Posts 8,761 Sorry Igor.......I didn't mean to start a debate. There is no question that deep cycle batteries can make an excellent starting battery but there is one characteristic that needs to be allowed for. A deep cycle battery has solid plates or plates with minimal perforations to allow long discharge. A starting battery has fully perforated plates to allow for high cranking amps. In very cold climates like where I and the OP live battery selection is all about cold cranking (CCA). The difference in the example I used comparing 400 CCA in a 24 deep cycle and 700 CCA in a 24 starting battery is huge. At -30F even a vehicle plugged in sometimes struggles to turn over........get lost in a tool store for half a day in -30 temps and your vehicle likely would not start. GregH...HVAC/R Tech 04-27-13, 08:22 AM #19 sgull's Avatar sgull sgull is offline Member Join Date Nov 2007 State: AK Posts 1,613 In the back of my mind I had the assumption if the battery did happen to need recharging after sitting for a month (I think maybe even over a month) as it did, that it would be no big deal I'd just take it in to get recharged, so I just kind of left it alone. Also, I had the sneaking suspicion several times that I should get out there and at least run the car now and then to avoid the battery dying, but neglected to do so. Furd, thanks for your explanation post #15. With a more clear understanding of what/why this happened it should most definitely help me to avoid such a situation in the future. 04-27-13, 08:45 AM #20 sgull's Avatar sgull sgull is offline Member Join Date Nov 2007 State: AK Posts 1,613 All we knew, it was "sitted". Any answer is only as good as question asked. Easy to make assumptions, buddy. Chill, no need to get upset over this. To what/whose "assumptions" are you referring? Perhaps some clarification is in order. I'm not familiar with the term/lingo "sitted" in regard to a battery. I guess it means sitting there unused, or maybe it means stored. Not that it probably even matters much. But hey I'm certainly not "getting upset over this". Didn't mean to be causing friction here just asking about a dead battery. Thanks (again) for the comments/advice otherwise though, especially that youtube video link you provided. 04-28-13, 08:26 AM #21 Sharp Advice's Avatar Sharp Advice Sharp Advice is offline Admin, Forums Host & Manager Join Date Feb 1998 State: CAL Posts 13,001 My Two Cents. Thinking out of the "Box." Deep cycle batteries are almost always used in boats. As a result, for the purposes of engine starting what's the difference? An engine is an engine. However, there should be no need to use a deep cycle battery in a land usage only vehicle. Possible battery drain may be as simple as an under engine compartment hood light, glove box light, sun visor light or truck light that does not turn off. Very often found to be the culprit years ago when I worked in the auto repair industry. And way back then a common ploy before regulations where in place and honesty was the norm, to charge the customer for all sorts of unnecessary never done diagnostic procedures and repair costs all of which were not needed.... 04-28-13, 08:56 AM #22 Sharp Advice's Avatar Sharp Advice Sharp Advice is offline Admin, Forums Host & Manager Join Date Feb 1998 State: CAL Posts 13,001 Additionally. Not uncommon to have at least two deep cycle batteries on a boat. Reasoning is, when boat arrives at the location, the engine is turned off. Captain then should use the battery switch to disconnect the starting battery (anyone of the two batteries) from the accessory battery. Thus leaving one battery for starting the engine. NEVER run down both batteries. Always disconnect one of the two in order to have one fully charged battery for engine restarting. Not uncommon for several electrical draw accessories to be running while boat engine is turned off. Left on always is the ship to shore radio. Accessories left on or running or also connected may include a bait tank pump, lights, bilge pump(s) and a few others that presently escape my mind... RV trailers, some of which, use the same systems. A means to separate one battery from the other. Very handy when dry camping. Especially when there is NO access to power outlet or generator, etc. Run one battery down but allow both to recharge via the tow vehicles charging system while in tow.... BTW: Battery toast??? Never heard of it. ??? Bet 'ya it tastes terrible. ... 04-28-13, 01:11 PM #23 Furd Furd is offline Member Join Date Mar 2006 State: WA Posts 10,283 There are differences between a true deep cycle battery and a "marine" battery. The deep cycle battery is designed to output a relatively low current continuously for a long period of time before needing to be recharged. The marine battery is a compromise between a "starting and ignition" (common car battery) and a true deep cycle battery in that it can both output a high current for the starter motor for a short period of time AND also output a low current for an extended period of time. As in all compromises there are drawbacks. Using a deep cycle battery for starting service WILL severely limit the life of that battery. Using a marine battery for only long term low current flows will give a lower lifetime than using a true deep cycle battery. You really need to buy the battery with the intended usage in mind. + Reply to Thread Previous Thread | Next Thread Posting Permissions You may not post new threads You may not post replies You may not post attachments You may not edit your posts BB code is On Smilies are On [IMG] code is On HTML code is Off Trackbacks are On Pingbacks are On Refbacks are On Forum Rules newsletter sign-up Email address: Ads by Google Vocus.com related products Kurgo Backseat Barrier$ 59.99 GoPetClub Pet Barrier$ 74.99 GoPetClub Pet Barrier PB2000$ 63.78 need project help? 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