Scam Emails Archive : Lotto/Lottery

Subject: itterly, half

From: Moshier <>

This email with the subject "itterly, half" was received in one of Scamdex's honeypot email accounts on Tue, 01 Sep 2009 20:17:33 -0700 and has been classified as a Lotto/Lottery Scam.

The sender was Moshier <>, although it may have been spoofed.

Nd in hers and begged for a little longer freedom. "Wait till next
fall," she said; "I must go to Saratoga one more summer. I shall never
be happy if I don't, and you, I dare say, wouldn't enjoy it a bit." The
doctor was not so sure of that. Her eyes, her voice, and the soft touch
of her hand made him feel very queer; and he was almost willing to go to
Saratoga himself if by these means he could secure her. "How much do
they charge?" he asked; and, with a flash of her bright eyes, the lady
answered, "I suppose both of us can get along with thirty or forty
dollars a week, including everything; but that isn't much, as I don't
care to stay more than two months!" This decided the doctor. He had not
three hundred dollars to throw away, and so he tried to persuade his
companion to give up Saratoga and go with him to Laurel Hill, telling
her, as an inducement, of the improvements he had made. "There were two
parlors now," he said, "and with her handsome furniture they would look
remarkably well." She did not tell him that her handsome furniture was
mortgaged for board and borrowed money--neither did she say that her
object in going to Saratoga was to try her powers upon a rich old
Southern bachelor who had returned from Europe, and who she knew was to
pass the coming summer at the Springs. If she could secure him Dr.
Kennedy might console himself as best he could, and she begged so hard
to defer their marriage until the autumn that the or gave up the
contest, and with a heavy heart prepared to turn his face homeward. "You
need not make any more repairs until I come; I'd rather see to them
myself," Miss Glendower said at parting; and wondering what further
improvements she could possibly suggest, now that the parlor windows
were all right, the doctor bade her adieu, and started for home.
Hitherto Maude had been his confidant, keeping her trust so well that no
one at Laurel Hill knew, exactly what his intentions were, and, as was
very, natural, immediately after his return he went to her for sympathy
in his disappointment. He found her weeping bitterly, and ere he could
lay before her his own grievances she appealed to him for sympathy and
aid. The man to whom her money was intrusted had speculated largely,
loaning some of it out West, at twenty per cent., investing some in
doubtful railroad stocks, and experimenting with the rest, until by some
unlucky chance he lost the whole, and, worse than all, had nothing of
his own with which to make amends. In short, Maude was penniless, and
J.C. De Vere in despair. She had written to him immediately, and he had

JPEG image