Scam Emails Archive : Advance Fee Fraud/419

Subject: Home based employment opportunities for talented people. No investment needed, no sign-up fees.

From: "gus helge" <>

This email with the subject "Home based employment opportunities for talented people. No investment needed, no sign-up fees." was received in one of Scamdex's honeypot email accounts on Sun, 16 Sep 2007 06:03:29 -0700 and has been classified as a Advance Fee Fraud/419 Scam.

The sender was "gus helge" <>, although it may have been spoofed.

International company Web Electronic Industry
is taking the candidates in the USA for the position of Local Agent.
We are looking for the trustworthy person with excellent organizational and communicative skills.
Good knowledge of computer and business relations practice will be your advantage.
This is a part-time job which can be combined with any permanent or another part-time job.
Average workload is up to 8 hours a week.
No special experience is necessary. Excellent compensation
package, the salary starts from $20,000 a year.
If you got interested in our vacancy and you have any questions,
please contact us
The offer is for USA citizens only.

A decade ago, Saraswat's research group was the first to begin developing a new kind of chip 
architecture: the 3-dimensional integrated circuit (3-D IC). Compared to the 2-D planar chips in 
computers today, 3-D chips can provide the same processing power with a reduced chip surface area. 
Also, instead of having long, twisting highways of wires, the stacked chips in 3-D ICs allow for 
short wires much like elevator shafts, as Professor Chidsey puts it-mitigating the problem of delay 
in the wires. Moreover, 3-D IC architecture allows the integration of all kinds of chips, since 
chips that require different technologies or materials can be stacked together.
Electronics: Building Chips in 3-D Dr. Krishna Saraswat, Electronic Engineering; Dr. Chris Chidsey, 
As a term, nanotechnology is clearly ambiguous. Moreover, it has already been claimed by the Drexlerians, apostles of K. Eric 
Drexler, who was one of the first to popularize nanotechnology with the publication of his 1987 book, Engineers of Creation: The 
Coming Era of Nanotechnology. According to Professor Steve Block, the Drexlerians have a futurist vision of nanotechnology in 
which self-replicating molecular assemblers programmed at the molecular-scale manufacture arbitrary products at the atomic level, 
molecule by molecule, bottom up. Some scientists have attempted to distance themselves from the futurist Drexlerians by claiming 
the term nanoscience. There's also another motivation for the excision of "technology" in this term. Nanoscience, as a 
term, captures the learning-the fundamental understanding of processes and materials at the nanoscale-that many scientists feel 
is necessary before or at the same time that researchers turn to engineering solutions. The term nanotechnology, on the other 
hand, reinforces what Chidsey describes as a "glib attitude" that "technology is the goal of science at this 
length scale."